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Somewhere in Spain

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Nowhere contributor, Lanna Apisukh traveled to Madrid and Segovia in the height of summertime and experienced sunsets as late as 10pm, fresh gazpacho and the rich cultural history of central Spain.

Lanna Apisukh has been taking photos for the past 20 years.  She lives in New York City and enjoys documenting everything from her daily subway commute to the scrappy bodega cats in her neighborhood. Her photos have been published on GothamistBrooklyn Vegan and most notably, Nowhere Magazine.

 

 

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In The Field: Skylark Birdsong

Photo by Paula Machin. 

If it is summer and you are walking down a road in rural Europe, listen for the skylarks in the open fields. You may not see the bird, but you will hear his song: an aria without breath. And if you are lucky enough to spot him through the lens of your binoculars, you will see the bulge of his throat as he rises in the midst of song. He must end soon, you think, but he continues on. Continue Reading…

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You Are Here: Dalai Lama

Photo by Kris Krug.

“The Dalai Lama is having a public audience.”

These were the first words I heard upon arrival to McLeod Ganj, India, exile home of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama. The strong smell of burning incense and Tibetan momos filled my nose, taxis and rickshaws noisily whirred by as I became enlightened to the magnitude of this little boy’s grandiose statement. I had been working in and traveling India for the past 7 months on trains and buses, fighting aggressive strangers and rabid pick-pockets along the way. Upper Dharamsala (McLeod Ganj), was to be my last stop before returning home to the West. I hopped off the bus and was greeted by an Indian boy with kind eyes and acid-washed skinny jeans. Continue Reading…

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Shelter: World’s Tallest Slum

Photo by Saúl Briceño.

The unfinished tower soars above Caracas’s financial district. Below its half-glassed windows the city spreads, magnificent. This view was meant for wealthy bankers, in offices with glossy tables and heavy paperweights whirring with the activity of a booming economy, but has instead become the privilege of schoolteachers, taxi drivers, auto mechanics and even policemen who are carving out a life on their own terms in the vacuum of a collapsed economy and a government that fails to meet their needs. Continue Reading…

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Expats: Pobre Culis

Photo by Delznaga.

Cuba’s most famous cigar roller is nicknamed Chinita (little Chinese girl) despite her rather robust frame and Philippine roots. Tiger Balm is one of the most accredited cures for just about anything. And Chinese flora pervades the landscape. Continue Reading…

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Cast Iron Camping

Out under the night skies in Big Sur after a long day of hiking and setting up camp, you may get a hankering for something other than trail mix and granola bars. Two friends of Nowhere trekked to Kirk Creek campground overlooking the Pacific and made a campfire pizza using a pie iron. Pie irons, which look like a thick metal flyswatter, are made of two cast iron squares that hook together on a long metal handle for placing it deep into the campfire. Watch the video they made of their trip and tips for making your own pie iron campfire pizza. Continue Reading…

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Pack It: Dickies Workpants

Photo from Dickies UK.

I got my first pair of Dickies workpants 14 years ago at Bennett’s Military Surplus in Little Rock, Arkansas. The reason I remember this is because I haven’t had to bother with any other brand of pants since then, unless I’m swimming, jogging, or going to a wedding.

Dickies began in Bryan, Texas in 1919 as the U.S. Overall Company, with an emphasis on making tough, durable bib overalls for workers. In 1922, they became the Williamson-Dickie Manufacturing Company and expanded their collection to workpants and workshirts. The company continued to grow, slowed only by the Great Depression, and during World War II they produced millions of uniforms for the nation’s armed forces. Since the war, they have grown to become the largest workwear manufacturer in the world. Continue Reading…

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Shelter: Cave Monks

Photo by Emily Strasser.

Built into a cave high above the Tserap River in the remote Himalayan valley of Lugnak, the ancient Phuktal Monastery is a hard day’s hike from the closest road. Just getting to the region, Zanksar, tucked on the western edge of the Tibetan Plateau between Kashmir and Ladakh in Northern India, takes twelves hours on murderous mountain roads from the closest city, or a ten-day trek through the mountains. Yet despite the difficulty, this place seems to have a way of being found. Continue Reading…

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The Expats: Neruda Abroad

Photo from Biblioteca del Congreso Nacional.

When poet Pablo Neruda fled his native Chile, over the Andes and into Argentina — “[a] trip I have taken through regions that are distant and antipodean,” he later reminisced — he had nearly died before he made it to the other side. He had been living underground for 14 months during President Videla’s crackdown on communism when, in 1948, a warrant was issued for his arrest. “There were no tracks and no paths, and I and my four companions pressed forward on our tortuous way, blindly seeking the quarter in which my own liberty lay.” Buried in his backpack was the manuscript for his epic poem, Canto General. Continue Reading…

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En Route: Moscow

 Photo by Erin O’Brien.

Twenty five years ago, Moscow hid behind a crumbling Iron curtain, famed, but elusive. The Soviet capital the world imagined, idealized even, but never thought they would see. Or at least not without thousands of dollars, several bribes, and layers upon layers of bureaucracy.

And then, 1989. Continue Reading…

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